Astronomical Society Just another WordPress site 2014-04-16T21:02:11Z http://www.astrosociety.org/feed/atom/ WordPress admin <![CDATA[Black Widow Pulsars: The Vengeful Corpses of Stars]]> http://www.astrosociety.org/?p=3103 2014-04-03T16:00:24Z 2014-03-31T22:19:38Z Dr. Roger RomaniJanuary 22, 2014

Dr. Roger Romani (Stanford University)

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NASA’s Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has revealed a violent high-energy universe full of stellar explosions, black hole jets, and pulsing stars. These cosmic objects are often faint …

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Dr. Roger RomaniJanuary 22, 2014

Dr. Roger Romani (Stanford University)

Listen (mp3 file, 22.2 MB)

NASA’s Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has revealed a violent high-energy universe full of stellar explosions, black hole jets, and pulsing stars. These cosmic objects are often faint when observed with visible light, but glow bright with gamma rays. Dr. Romani describes the quest to discover the true nature of the most puzzling of these gamma-ray sources. Several turn out to be a kind of bizarre star corpse called a ‘black widow’ pulsar.

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admin <![CDATA[Veteran Astronomy Educator, Astrophysicist, and Science Writer Dr. Linda Shore Named Executive Director of the ASP]]> http://www.astrosociety.org/?p=2952 2014-01-23T22:18:34Z 2014-01-23T22:18:34Z The Astronomical Society of the Pacific (ASP) is pleased to announce the appointment of Dr. Linda Shore to the position of Executive Director.

Dr. Linda Shore

Most recently, Shore served as Director of the Teacher Institute at San Francisco’s renowned science museum, the …

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The Astronomical Society of the Pacific (ASP) is pleased to announce the appointment of Dr. Linda Shore to the position of Executive Director.

Dr. Linda Shore

Most recently, Shore served as Director of the Teacher Institute at San Francisco’s renowned science museum, the Exploratorium. While there she led a staff of scientists and educators, and created nationally recognized teaching programs. She was also responsible for fund development, grants program, and expanding institutional reach by forging collaborations with national and international museums and science centers. Shore has co-authored Exploratorium science and education books, and written articles about popular science and science education for the public. A native San Franciscan who has spent most of her life in the Bay Area, she holds a PhD in science education from Boston University, and a master’s degree in physics and astronomy from San Francisco State University. Shore was also the recipient of a prestigious Smithsonian Pre-doctoral Fellowship to work at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics where she developed curriculum and conducted research on astronomy learning for the National Science Foundation funded program, Project STAR (Science Teaching through its Astronomical Roots).

Dr. Linda Shore reflected in many mirrors

“I am deeply honored and excited to assume the role of Executive Director for the ASP, an organization whose mission so strongly resonates with my personal passion for increasing science literacy through the study of astronomy,” said Dr. Shore. “I look forward to continuing the organization’s 125-year history of supporting a large and diverse community of astronomy enthusiasts and helping the organization to become a leader in science education for the next century.”

“Dr. Shore brings a unique background combining a passion for astronomy, love of science and science education, and management experience,” said Gordon Myers, ASP Board President. “She’ll be a great leader, and we’re excited to have her join the ASP.”

Dr. Shore will be introduced at the ASP’s 125th Anniversary celebration dinner on Friday, February 7 at Delancey Street restaurant on the Embarcadero in San Francisco. (Tickets for the event are available for sale via the ASP’s website.) Dr. Shore assumes leadership of the organization following the seven-year tenure of James G. Manning.

About the ASP

Now in its 125th year, the ASP is one of the most recognized and well-respected nonprofit astronomy organizations in the country. Boasting diverse national programs endorsed by NASA and the NSF, publications, and awards designed to serve, empower, and recognize professional and amateur astronomers, as well as formal and informal educators, the ASP is unique in its mission to foster science literacy and share the excitement of exploration and discovery through astronomy.

The ASP is headquartered in the Ingleside neighborhood of San Francisco, and is financially supported by member dues, donations, grants, subscriptions, and retail sales.

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admin <![CDATA[Dr. Harold McNamara]]> http://www.astrosociety.org/?p=2926 2014-01-13T22:50:32Z 2014-01-13T18:38:53Z The ASP deeply mourns the January 10th passing of BYU astronomy professor Dr. Harold McNamara, who served as Editor of the science journal “Publications of the ASP” from 1968 to 2004.

Dr. Harold McNamara

Dr. McNamara also enthusiastically launched new organizational enterprise in 1987, …

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The ASP deeply mourns the January 10th passing of BYU astronomy professor Dr. Harold McNamara, who served as Editor of the science journal “Publications of the ASP” from 1968 to 2004.

Dr. Harold McNamara

Dr. McNamara also enthusiastically launched new organizational enterprise in 1987, the ASP Conference Series (publication), for which he served as Editor for 16 years.

Dr. McNamara was an internationally recognized authority in intrinsic variable and eclipsing binary stars. In 2000, he received the George Van Biesbroeck Prize by the American Astronomical Society for “long-term extraordinary or unselfish service to astronomy.” He was also honored in 2010 with the Distinguished Service Award by the Utah Academy of Sciences, Arts & Letters.

http://www.bergmortuary.com/obituaries/Delbert-Mcnamara/#!/Obituary
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/D._Harold_McNamara

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admin <![CDATA[Dr. Michael G. Gibbs]]> http://www.astrosociety.org/?p=2895 2014-01-22T00:28:25Z 2013-12-12T05:37:29Z It is with profound sadness that the Astronomical Society of the Pacific reports the sudden death of its Board member and secretary, Dr. Michael G. Gibbs on December 10, 2013.

Dr. Michael G. Gibbs

Michael has served as a Board member since 2008, and …

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It is with profound sadness that the Astronomical Society of the Pacific reports the sudden death of its Board member and secretary, Dr. Michael G. Gibbs on December 10, 2013.

Dr. Michael G. Gibbs

Michael has served as a Board member since 2008, and as the Board secretary since 2010. Prior to that, from 2005 to 2008, Michael was the Society’s Director of Advancement, and was instrumental in reviving and advancing the ASP’s Fund Development effort.

The Society has lost a true friend, and we will miss his intelligence, his guidance, and his quick wit.

http://www.mlive.com/news/flint/index.ssf/2013/12/dr_michael_g_gibbs_remembered.html

 

 

 

 

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admin <![CDATA[The Chelyabinsk Meteor: Can We Survive a Bigger Impact?]]> http://www.astrosociety.org/?p=2890 2013-12-10T18:05:26Z 2013-12-10T18:05:26Z Dr. David MorrisonNovember 6, 2013

Dr. David Morrison (SETI Institute and NASA Ames Research Center)

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In February 2013, a rocky projectile entered the Earth’s atmosphere and its explosion, at an altitude of 14 mi, released energy equivalent …

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Dr. David MorrisonNovember 6, 2013

Dr. David Morrison (SETI Institute and NASA Ames Research Center)

Listen (mp3 file, 26.4 MB)

In February 2013, a rocky projectile entered the Earth’s atmosphere and its explosion, at an altitude of 14 mi, released energy equivalent to a couple dozen Hiroshima-sized atom bombs. About two minutes later, the shock wave reached the ground in Chelyabinsk, Russia, breaking windows and injuring about 1500 people from flying glass. Has this event served as a kind of cosmic wake-up call for planetary defense? NASA recently announced a “grand challenge” to find all asteroids that could threaten human populations, and to figure out how to deal with them. David Morrison, a nationally-recognized expert about asteroids, discusses the Russian impact and evaluates ways we might meet the grand challenge to protect our population from space debris.

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admin <![CDATA[2013 ASP Annual Report]]> http://www.astrosociety.org/?p=2871 2013-12-05T18:57:22Z 2013-12-03T20:44:51Z Greetings, Champions of Astronomy and Science Literacy!

Your Astronomical Society of the Pacific is pleased and excited to share our FY2013 Annual Report. You are encouraged to read it through and learn about the many ways the ASP has made …

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Greetings, Champions of Astronomy and Science Literacy!

Your Astronomical Society of the Pacific is pleased and excited to share our FY2013 Annual Report. You are encouraged to read it through and learn about the many ways the ASP has made an impact among its diverse program participants.

We also hope you will see how YOU have made a difference in the lives and learning of all who seek to explore and discover the unique science of astronomy. Members, donors, and funders from the private and public sectors make a critical investment in education, and help ensure our science literate future. We could not succeed without you!

Looking ahead, the ASP Staff and Board of Directors are committed to delivering the absolute best in services, programs and publications for professionals, classroom teachers, informal educators, and amateurs – all of whom represent a vital link in the learning continuum. Even in the face of federal budget threats to traditional sources of revenue via competitive grant programs at NASA and NSF, we remain undaunted in our endeavors.

As we close out another successful fiscal year, we hope that you share in our pride, excitement and commitment. Your belief in the ASP and in science literacy is reflected each and every day – manifested in the diversity of our work and the diversity of those who benefit from our programs.

We look forward to keeping in touch with you as we continue to foster the joy of exploration and discovery, and advance science literacy through astronomy.

Thank you for looking up with the ASP!

2013 Annual Report (pdf, 3.1 MB)

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admin <![CDATA[How the Universe Went from Smooth to Lumpy: The Modern Origins Story]]> http://www.astrosociety.org/?p=2842 2013-10-28T17:01:03Z 2013-10-28T16:46:58Z Dr. Eliot QuataertOctober 2, 2013

Dr. Eliot Quataert (University of California, Berkeley)

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Dr. Eliot Quataert provides an overview of the modern understanding of our origins in astrophysics. The story begins in the infant universe, which we now …

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Dr. Eliot QuataertOctober 2, 2013

Dr. Eliot Quataert (University of California, Berkeley)

Listen (mp3 file, 33.9 MB)

Dr. Eliot Quataert provides an overview of the modern understanding of our origins in astrophysics. The story begins in the infant universe, which we now know was remarkably smooth compared to what we see around us today, with only tiny differences in its properties from one part to another. By contrast, in the present universe there are enormous differences in the properties of matter in different locations. Dr. Quataert describes how the universe has evolved to its current state, emphasizing how gravity reigns supreme and builds up the planets, stars, and galaxies required for biological evolution to proceed.

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admin <![CDATA[The Astronomical Society of the Pacific Invites Nominations for the Organization’s 2014 Annual Awards]]> http://www.astrosociety.org/?p=2766 2013-10-11T20:23:57Z 2013-10-11T20:22:54Z The Astronomical Society of the Pacific (ASP) is accepting nominations for the organization’s national annual awards which recognize special achievements in astronomy research, technology, education, and public outreach. Nominations are welcome in seven categories, online or in writing until January …

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The Astronomical Society of the Pacific (ASP) is accepting nominations for the organization’s national annual awards which recognize special achievements in astronomy research, technology, education, and public outreach. Nominations are welcome in seven categories, online or in writing until January 1, 2014. Honorees receive a cash award and engraved plaque, as well as travel and lodging to accept the award at a banquet which takes place as part of the ASP’s Annual Meeting next summer. The awards for which nominations are accepted are as follows:

The Maria and Eric Muhlmann Award recognizes recent significant observational results made possible by innovative advances in astronomical instrumentation, software, or observational infrastructure.

The Robert J. Trumpler Award is presented each year to a recent recipient of the PhD degree in North America whose research is considered unusually important to astronomy.

The Klumpke-Roberts Award recognizes those who have made outstanding contributions to the public understanding and appreciation of astronomy.

The Richard A. Emmons Award celebrates outstanding achievement in the teaching of college-level introductory astronomy for non-science majors.

The Thomas J. Brennan Award is given for excellence in the teaching of astronomy at the high school level in North America.

The Amateur Achievement Award recognizes significant observational or technological contributions to astronomy or amateur astronomy by an individual not employed in the field of astronomy in a professional capacity.

The Las Cumbres Amateur Outreach Award honors outstanding educational outreach by an amateur astronomer to K-12 youth and the interested lay public.

The nominations deadline is January 1, 2014. Submission guidelines, lists of past recipients and additional information may be found here: www.astrosociety.org/about-us/awards

About the ASP

Founded in 1889 in San Francisco, the ASP’s mission is to increase the understanding and appreciation of astronomy–by engaging scientists, educators, enthusiasts and the public–to advance science and science literacy. The ASP publishes scholarly and educational materials, conducts professional development programs for formal and informal educators, and holds conferences, symposia, and workshops for astronomers and educators specializing in education and public outreach. More information may be found at www.astrosociety.org

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admin <![CDATA[ASP Executive Director Opening]]> http://www.astrosociety.org/?p=2643 2013-09-12T22:05:49Z 2013-09-12T22:05:49Z The Astronomical Society of the Pacific (ASP) is seeking interested applicants for its Executive Director position. The ASP, headquartered in San Francisco, is a nonprofit organization founded in 1889. The ASP seeks an experienced and dynamic leader who shares our …

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The Astronomical Society of the Pacific (ASP) is seeking interested applicants for its Executive Director position. The ASP, headquartered in San Francisco, is a nonprofit organization founded in 1889. The ASP seeks an experienced and dynamic leader who shares our passion for astronomy, and our goal to use astronomy to advance science and science literacy. The ASP works with professional astronomers, teachers, outreach professionals, and amateur astronomers creating approaches to teach astronomy that ignite student and public interest in astronomy and science. The ASP also publishes two highly regarded professional publications serving the astronomy research community. We offer competitive compensation and benefits. Information about the ASP can be found at www.astrosociety.org. For a full position profile, interested applicants may email search {at} astrosociety.org.

Announcement: Astronomical Society of the Pacific Executive Director Announces Plans to Depart

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admin <![CDATA[Astronomical Society of the Pacific Executive Director Announces Plans to Depart]]> http://www.astrosociety.org/?p=2556 2013-09-06T20:41:03Z 2013-09-06T20:41:03Z James Manning, ASP Executive Director, has announced plans to resign from the position effective February 7, 2014—the 125th birthday of the ASP. Manning has served as Executive Director since 2007.

“I’m very proud of the work the staff and I …

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James Manning, ASP Executive Director, has announced plans to resign from the position effective February 7, 2014—the 125th birthday of the ASP. Manning has served as Executive Director since 2007.

“I’m very proud of the work the staff and I have accomplished during my tenure,” Manning said. “We established a firm financial, operational and programmatic foundation for the Society during an ongoing period of economic challenges in both the nonprofit and public sectors. We’ve taken the ASP in new strategic directions, grown and expanded existing programs and created new ones, grown our digital presence via social and mobile media, and developed sustainable partnerships with other organizations. We have also increased the ASP’s visibility and engagement on the national stage.

“But it’s time for me to pursue other interests, and to support and encourage new leadership to build on our accomplishments to carry the ASP into the next 125 years. I look forward to assisting in the transition to a new executive director.”

ASP Board President Gordon Myers thanked Manning for his hard work and dedication to ASP. “His work put ASP in a sound financial position and made it a leader in the astronomy education and public outreach community.”

The search for a new executive director will begin shortly.

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